Seated Slump: Test or Treatment?

The seated slump test is widely known for its use as an assessment of a patient’s neuromechanical sensitivity (as the result of a disc herniation, neural tension, etc). But is there any benefit to perform this test if the patient is not reporting any radicular symptoms? A 2012 study by Nagrale et al investigated the effect of slump stretching versus lumbar mobilization with exercise in subjects with non-radicular low back pain. The findings? Those performing the slump stretching showed significant improvements in regards to Oswestry Disability Index scores, pain reduction, and fear-avoidance behavior. What does this mean? Just because someone may not complain of pain radiating down their leg does not mean that you should ignore the mobility of their nervous system. Your nerves are like wires connecting your nose to your toes; therefore, if your wires are “sticky,” you may experience increased symptoms. Read the article, let me know your thoughts!

Nagrale AV, Patil SP, Gandhi RA, Learman K. Effect of slump stretching versus lumbar mobilization with exercise in subjects with non-radicular low back pain: a randomized clinical trial. J Man Manip Ther. 2012 Feb;20(1):35-42.
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